Paper Number

1339

Paper Type

Complete Research Paper

Abstract

E-government implementation is prospering worldwide. However, some countries such as Germany struggle to implement an e-government structure that their citizens accept and use. A critical issue arises when the services are not used despite a legal obligation. Regardless of the legal obligations some citizens do not comply and postpone the usage past the deadline. To study this phenomenon, we applied the theoretical lens of Temporal Motivation Theory (TMT) and technology acceptance. Data collected from 308 German property owners legally-obliged to submit a property tax declaration online was analyzed using covariance-based structural equation modeling. The findings confirm that factors related to procrastination from TMT and technology acceptance significantly influence the intention to comply with the deadline to use e-government services. Our research shows opportunities for increasing the deadline compliance for e-government usage and decreasing the tendency to procrastinate. It opens a new avenue for future research on e-government and procrastination.

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Jun 14th, 12:00 AM

UNPLANNED DELAYS: UNDERSTANDING PROCRASTINATION`S INFLUENCE ON CITIZEN`S DEADLINE COMPLIANCE IN MANDATORY E-GOVERNMENT

E-government implementation is prospering worldwide. However, some countries such as Germany struggle to implement an e-government structure that their citizens accept and use. A critical issue arises when the services are not used despite a legal obligation. Regardless of the legal obligations some citizens do not comply and postpone the usage past the deadline. To study this phenomenon, we applied the theoretical lens of Temporal Motivation Theory (TMT) and technology acceptance. Data collected from 308 German property owners legally-obliged to submit a property tax declaration online was analyzed using covariance-based structural equation modeling. The findings confirm that factors related to procrastination from TMT and technology acceptance significantly influence the intention to comply with the deadline to use e-government services. Our research shows opportunities for increasing the deadline compliance for e-government usage and decreasing the tendency to procrastinate. It opens a new avenue for future research on e-government and procrastination.

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