Paper Number

1840

Paper Type

Complete Research Paper

Abstract

In today's data-driven world, collecting users’ data has become a valuable commodity, especially in healthcare, where data donations can have wide-reaching benefits, such as identifying patterns in data sets and deriving diagnoses more efficiently. Consequently, persuading and manipulating users with different communication styles to give consent is an emerging issue since informed consent is crucial to protecting users’ rights. In this regard, conversational agents (CAs) offer an opportunity to interact with and educate users. However, the extent to which a CA’s communication style influences users’ perception of manipulation and subsequent intention to donate data remains unclear. In this study (N=174), we examine the effects of different communication styles (informative vs. non-informative) and their effects on users’ cognitive decision-making process. We find that the informative communication style does not directly influence the perceived manipulation in users; instead, it is influenced by how users perceive CAs’ humanness and information quality.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 14th, 12:00 AM

LET’S GET INFORMATIVE – PERCEIVED MANIPULATION AND PERSUASIVENESS BY CONVERSATIONAL AGENTS FOR HEALTH DATA DONATIONS

In today's data-driven world, collecting users’ data has become a valuable commodity, especially in healthcare, where data donations can have wide-reaching benefits, such as identifying patterns in data sets and deriving diagnoses more efficiently. Consequently, persuading and manipulating users with different communication styles to give consent is an emerging issue since informed consent is crucial to protecting users’ rights. In this regard, conversational agents (CAs) offer an opportunity to interact with and educate users. However, the extent to which a CA’s communication style influences users’ perception of manipulation and subsequent intention to donate data remains unclear. In this study (N=174), we examine the effects of different communication styles (informative vs. non-informative) and their effects on users’ cognitive decision-making process. We find that the informative communication style does not directly influence the perceived manipulation in users; instead, it is influenced by how users perceive CAs’ humanness and information quality.

When commenting on articles, please be friendly, welcoming, respectful and abide by the AIS eLibrary Discussion Thread Code of Conduct posted here.