Paper Number

2280

Paper Type

CRP

Abstract

Previous research on privacy has investigated information sharing as a single instance in time. What is not understood is how multiple instances of information sharing interact. Additionally, research has found inconsistent results on information sensitivity on disclosure. We theorise that these conflicting results are due to the anchoring and adjustment decision-making heuristic. The initial level of information sensitivity acts as an external anchoring point for subsequent sharing. Additionally, an individual’s disposition toward approach–avoidance, acting as an internal anchor, moderates the relationship between initial and subsequent information disclosure. Using a longitudinally, time-ordered experimental design, we found that while sharing behaviour of low-sensitive information is not affected by either the approach–avoidance tendencies of the individual or sensitivity level of initial information exposure, the sharing of high-sensitive information is significantly affected by both, such that disclosure is negatively influenced by initial exposure to high-sensitive details for those who display avoidance tendencies.

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Jun 14th, 12:00 AM

Anchoring-and-Adjustment, Approach–Avoidance Disposition, and Information Sensitivity on Information Disclosure: A Longitudinally, Time-Ordered Experiment Using EEG in E-Commerce and Social Media

Previous research on privacy has investigated information sharing as a single instance in time. What is not understood is how multiple instances of information sharing interact. Additionally, research has found inconsistent results on information sensitivity on disclosure. We theorise that these conflicting results are due to the anchoring and adjustment decision-making heuristic. The initial level of information sensitivity acts as an external anchoring point for subsequent sharing. Additionally, an individual’s disposition toward approach–avoidance, acting as an internal anchor, moderates the relationship between initial and subsequent information disclosure. Using a longitudinally, time-ordered experimental design, we found that while sharing behaviour of low-sensitive information is not affected by either the approach–avoidance tendencies of the individual or sensitivity level of initial information exposure, the sharing of high-sensitive information is significantly affected by both, such that disclosure is negatively influenced by initial exposure to high-sensitive details for those who display avoidance tendencies.

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