Paper Number

1466

Paper Type

SP

Abstract

This paper investigates how online co-production communities use dialogue to self-resolve content disputes - disagreements over specific elements of a community’s knowledge product - without appealing to an external decision maker or authority structure. Drawing from research on knowledge creation and online communities, it posits that content disputes are characterized by two fundamental dialogue types: knowledge staking and knowledge integration. It argues that knowledge staking - information sharing dialogue that reflects and substantiates a personal perspective - is conducive to self-resolution when it consists of relative high-quality argumentation. It argues that knowledge integration - interlocutors’ attempts to tease out an intersubjectively acceptable dispute resolution - is conducive to self-resolution when it reflects implicit but not explicit alignment. It argues that order matters; disputes where knowledge staking precedes knowledge integration are more likely to self-resolve. Finally, it outlines the empirical approach for validating these arguments and identifies areas for future research.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 14th, 12:00 AM

TALKING THROUGH TURF WARS: HOW DIALOGUE HELPS RESOLVE ONLINE CO-PRODUCTION DISPUTES

This paper investigates how online co-production communities use dialogue to self-resolve content disputes - disagreements over specific elements of a community’s knowledge product - without appealing to an external decision maker or authority structure. Drawing from research on knowledge creation and online communities, it posits that content disputes are characterized by two fundamental dialogue types: knowledge staking and knowledge integration. It argues that knowledge staking - information sharing dialogue that reflects and substantiates a personal perspective - is conducive to self-resolution when it consists of relative high-quality argumentation. It argues that knowledge integration - interlocutors’ attempts to tease out an intersubjectively acceptable dispute resolution - is conducive to self-resolution when it reflects implicit but not explicit alignment. It argues that order matters; disputes where knowledge staking precedes knowledge integration are more likely to self-resolve. Finally, it outlines the empirical approach for validating these arguments and identifies areas for future research.

When commenting on articles, please be friendly, welcoming, respectful and abide by the AIS eLibrary Discussion Thread Code of Conduct posted here.