Abstract

Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) is a popular microtasking platform connecting those who need work done with those willing to do it. However AMT has come under increasing scrutiny for the way workers are treated on its platform. This paper examines one particular component of AMT’s microtasking process by conducting a formal ethical analysis, using Tavani’s Compre-hensive Cyberethics Methodology, on the way work submitted for evaluation is assessed and either accepted or rejected. The study finds that the system is skewed in favour of those evaluat-ing the work, with little recourse for workers, and an apparent disinterest from AMT. This paper contributes to the continuing debate over the governance of, and responsibilities for, those en-gaged in digital work through such platforms.

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