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Complete

Paper Number

1068

Description

Individuals' privacy concern has been found to be swayed by counter arguments. This study investigated the swaying influence of amplifying vs. diminishing arguments (i.e., counter arguments that seek to increase or decrease privacy concerns) on individuals’ privacy concerns and the moderating impact of level of sensitivity and privacy-related knowledge. Data was collected using online survey and respondents were college students enrolled in a Midwest university. Results suggest that the swaying influence depends on the level of sensitivity—the greatest swaying influence happens when individuals are presented with amplifying arguments for a highly sensitive issue. In addition, the swaying influences are smaller for individuals with high privacy knowledge; for those with low privacy knowledge, however, the swaying influence is stronger when the arguments are consistent (as compared to inconsistent) with their initial assessments. In a word, individuals with low privacy knowledge show greater cognitive bias when processing privacy related arguments.

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Aug 10th, 12:00 AM

Swaying Individuals’ Privacy Concerns Through Amplifying vs. Diminishing Counter Arguments: An Awareness-Motivation-Capability Perspective

Individuals' privacy concern has been found to be swayed by counter arguments. This study investigated the swaying influence of amplifying vs. diminishing arguments (i.e., counter arguments that seek to increase or decrease privacy concerns) on individuals’ privacy concerns and the moderating impact of level of sensitivity and privacy-related knowledge. Data was collected using online survey and respondents were college students enrolled in a Midwest university. Results suggest that the swaying influence depends on the level of sensitivity—the greatest swaying influence happens when individuals are presented with amplifying arguments for a highly sensitive issue. In addition, the swaying influences are smaller for individuals with high privacy knowledge; for those with low privacy knowledge, however, the swaying influence is stronger when the arguments are consistent (as compared to inconsistent) with their initial assessments. In a word, individuals with low privacy knowledge show greater cognitive bias when processing privacy related arguments.

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