Location

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

Event Website

http://www.hicss.hawaii.edu

Start Date

1-4-2017

End Date

1-7-2017

Description

This paper studies platform ecosystems, a novel business entity built upon a platform coordinating the interactions between suppliers and users, particularly in the IT service sectors. Borrowing words from two core firm theories---resource-based view (RBV) and transaction cost view (TCV)---, we propose that the platform ecosystem works at the boundary between “market and hierarchy.” To show this, we develop a conceptual, stylized, dynamic model for the platform ecosystem with typical notions in RBV and TCV: in particular, installed-base, player heterogeneity, and platform’s investment as primary ingredients. Our findings from equilibrium analyses and simulations largely confirm that both RVB and TCV are valid for understanding a platform ecosystem. We, however, also identify some contingencies where RBV is limited, and propose a hypothesis that the platform’ investment is more crucial for fostering an ecosystem. This implies that the platform starts from the point near market and maneuvers the ecosystem toward a hierarchy, utilizing its investment as a driver.

COinS
 
Jan 4th, 12:00 AM Jan 7th, 12:00 AM

Value-Creation Dynamics in Platform Ecosystem: A Firm Theory Lens

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

This paper studies platform ecosystems, a novel business entity built upon a platform coordinating the interactions between suppliers and users, particularly in the IT service sectors. Borrowing words from two core firm theories---resource-based view (RBV) and transaction cost view (TCV)---, we propose that the platform ecosystem works at the boundary between “market and hierarchy.” To show this, we develop a conceptual, stylized, dynamic model for the platform ecosystem with typical notions in RBV and TCV: in particular, installed-base, player heterogeneity, and platform’s investment as primary ingredients. Our findings from equilibrium analyses and simulations largely confirm that both RVB and TCV are valid for understanding a platform ecosystem. We, however, also identify some contingencies where RBV is limited, and propose a hypothesis that the platform’ investment is more crucial for fostering an ecosystem. This implies that the platform starts from the point near market and maneuvers the ecosystem toward a hierarchy, utilizing its investment as a driver.

https://aisel.aisnet.org/hicss-50/os/managing_ecosystems/9