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Paper Type

Complete

Abstract

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a critical aspect of modern business, blending morality with strategy to prioritize ethical standards alongside profits. This study investigates the integration of Artificial Intelligence (AI) as a grouping tool in business ethics courses, aiming to understand its impact on students' attitudes towards CSR. By combining socialization theory and ethical climate frameworks, we compare relationship-oriented groups formed autonomously with task-oriented groups facilitated by AI decision-making. Our randomized controlled experiment involving 84 graduate students reveals that human-driven grouping fosters a caring ethical climate, enhancing CSR attitudes, while AI-driven grouping tends to cultivate an instrumental climate, hindering CSR development. Furthermore, trust in AI influences the mediating effect of an instrumental climate on CSR attitudes. This research extends socialization theory into business ethics education and provides insights into the limitations and optimization potential of AI-driven instructional methods in fostering CSR values.

Paper Number

1265

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

The Impact of Integrating AI into Business Ethics Education on Students' Attitudes Towards Corporate Social Responsibility

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a critical aspect of modern business, blending morality with strategy to prioritize ethical standards alongside profits. This study investigates the integration of Artificial Intelligence (AI) as a grouping tool in business ethics courses, aiming to understand its impact on students' attitudes towards CSR. By combining socialization theory and ethical climate frameworks, we compare relationship-oriented groups formed autonomously with task-oriented groups facilitated by AI decision-making. Our randomized controlled experiment involving 84 graduate students reveals that human-driven grouping fosters a caring ethical climate, enhancing CSR attitudes, while AI-driven grouping tends to cultivate an instrumental climate, hindering CSR development. Furthermore, trust in AI influences the mediating effect of an instrumental climate on CSR attitudes. This research extends socialization theory into business ethics education and provides insights into the limitations and optimization potential of AI-driven instructional methods in fostering CSR values.

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