Abstract

Previous studies on cloud computing reveal that there exists an acute lack of theoretical framework and empirical evidence to explain the underpinning forces at play in cloud computing implementation. Therefore, through the lens of the institutional theory and applying a conceptual model by Tolbert and Zucker on the component process of institutionalization, this paper reports the findings from a three-year study on the educational sector of a developing country on the implementation of cloud computing. The analysis of the findings revealed that, the need to implement cloud computing in the case university was influenced by coercive, normative and mimetic institutional pressure placed on enhancing educational service delivery by the governing council of the university in response to criticism regarding delivering world-class educational service using information technology (IS innovation) as well as the need to balance what is needed with what is affordable. The contribution of this study lies in its ability to address the dichotomous relationship that exists between technical and institutional environments. Though technology is usually discussed in isolation to the institutional process, the study reveals that to perfectly explain the institutionalization of a technological artifact, it is important for it to be embedded in the practices of the institution.

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An Institutional Analysis of Cloud Computing Implementation in the Educational Sector: Evidence from a Developing Economy

Previous studies on cloud computing reveal that there exists an acute lack of theoretical framework and empirical evidence to explain the underpinning forces at play in cloud computing implementation. Therefore, through the lens of the institutional theory and applying a conceptual model by Tolbert and Zucker on the component process of institutionalization, this paper reports the findings from a three-year study on the educational sector of a developing country on the implementation of cloud computing. The analysis of the findings revealed that, the need to implement cloud computing in the case university was influenced by coercive, normative and mimetic institutional pressure placed on enhancing educational service delivery by the governing council of the university in response to criticism regarding delivering world-class educational service using information technology (IS innovation) as well as the need to balance what is needed with what is affordable. The contribution of this study lies in its ability to address the dichotomous relationship that exists between technical and institutional environments. Though technology is usually discussed in isolation to the institutional process, the study reveals that to perfectly explain the institutionalization of a technological artifact, it is important for it to be embedded in the practices of the institution.