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Start Date

16-8-2018 12:00 AM

Description

Impulsive behavior has been found to negatively affect decision making. However, its impact on risky cybersecurity behaviors has not been examined sufficiently. Hadlington (2017) conducted a survey to examine the relationship between the three dimensions of impulsivity and risky cybersecurity behavior (RScB). His results showed that risky cybersecurity behavior was positively correlated to attentional impulsivity and motor impulsivity, but was negatively correlated with non-planning impulsivity. He also examined the relationship between internet addiction and attitude towards cybersecurity, and, risky cybersecurity behaviors. In preparation for longer-term research, we replicate his study to ascertain the robustness of the impulsivity scales and results of Hadlington’s study. Most of the correlations between the variables in Hadlington’s study are confirmed in our study, though there are some differences that need further examination. Overall, we see a sufficient basis to pursue research on the effects of impulsivity on risky security behaviors.

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Impulsivity and Risky Cybersecurity Behaviors: A Replication

Impulsive behavior has been found to negatively affect decision making. However, its impact on risky cybersecurity behaviors has not been examined sufficiently. Hadlington (2017) conducted a survey to examine the relationship between the three dimensions of impulsivity and risky cybersecurity behavior (RScB). His results showed that risky cybersecurity behavior was positively correlated to attentional impulsivity and motor impulsivity, but was negatively correlated with non-planning impulsivity. He also examined the relationship between internet addiction and attitude towards cybersecurity, and, risky cybersecurity behaviors. In preparation for longer-term research, we replicate his study to ascertain the robustness of the impulsivity scales and results of Hadlington’s study. Most of the correlations between the variables in Hadlington’s study are confirmed in our study, though there are some differences that need further examination. Overall, we see a sufficient basis to pursue research on the effects of impulsivity on risky security behaviors.