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Start Date

16-8-2018 12:00 AM

Description

Using the web carries risks for people’s privacy. In order to enable people to protect themselves, they need to know about the potential threats associated with surfing the web. Based on the theory of constructivism, we argue that people better assimilate knowledge regarding privacy risks on the web when they actively experience these risks, rather than passively learn about them. More specifically, we hypothesize that methods requiring high learner engagement are more effective at conveying web privacy risks than those that require low learner engagement. In order to empirically evaluate our hypothesis, we plan to conduct an experiment. More specifically, we seek to compare the privacy risk levels of three groups: a control group, a group that simply reads about the potential negative outcomes of being tracked, and a group that experiences their individual surfing behavior being tracked.

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Using Experiential Learning to Effectively Inform People About Web Privacy Risks

Using the web carries risks for people’s privacy. In order to enable people to protect themselves, they need to know about the potential threats associated with surfing the web. Based on the theory of constructivism, we argue that people better assimilate knowledge regarding privacy risks on the web when they actively experience these risks, rather than passively learn about them. More specifically, we hypothesize that methods requiring high learner engagement are more effective at conveying web privacy risks than those that require low learner engagement. In order to empirically evaluate our hypothesis, we plan to conduct an experiment. More specifically, we seek to compare the privacy risk levels of three groups: a control group, a group that simply reads about the potential negative outcomes of being tracked, and a group that experiences their individual surfing behavior being tracked.