Location

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

Event Website

http://hicss.hawaii.edu/

Start Date

1-3-2018

End Date

1-6-2018

Description

Commercial bike-sharing system is growing rapidly as a critical form of the sharing economy. Although past research has discussed the design and operation of commercial bike-sharing systems, there have been few studies examining the factors motivating the use of such systems. This study integrates the technology acceptance model (TAM) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to develop a holistic model to explain the intention to use commercial bike-sharing systems. The PLS-SEM results from a survey with 286 users reveal that the intention to use commercial bike-sharing systems is positively affected by perceived usefulness of the system, attitude toward bike-sharing and perceived behavioral control. Further, we find that attitude toward the bike-sharing is positively affected by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the system. Beyond our expectation, subjective norm has no significant effect on the intention to use. Implications and directions for future research are also discussed.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 3rd, 12:00 AM Jan 6th, 12:00 AM

Understanding the Intention to Use Commercial Bike-sharing Systems: An Integration of TAM and TPB

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

Commercial bike-sharing system is growing rapidly as a critical form of the sharing economy. Although past research has discussed the design and operation of commercial bike-sharing systems, there have been few studies examining the factors motivating the use of such systems. This study integrates the technology acceptance model (TAM) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to develop a holistic model to explain the intention to use commercial bike-sharing systems. The PLS-SEM results from a survey with 286 users reveal that the intention to use commercial bike-sharing systems is positively affected by perceived usefulness of the system, attitude toward bike-sharing and perceived behavioral control. Further, we find that attitude toward the bike-sharing is positively affected by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the system. Beyond our expectation, subjective norm has no significant effect on the intention to use. Implications and directions for future research are also discussed.

http://aisel.aisnet.org/hicss-51/cl/sharing_economy/4