Location

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

Event Website

http://www.hicss.hawaii.edu

Start Date

1-4-2017

End Date

1-7-2017

Description

Using social media in employee selection processes is relatively new behavior that raises many important questions. Although managers report using sites like Facebook to review applicants, little is known about how these sites influence assessments of those candidates. This exploratory study reports on an experiment designed to evaluate competing hypotheses regarding (in)consistent gender norm-based communication on Facebook and subsequent attraction and hiring decisions. All participants were required to have been responsible for actual hiring decisions during their careers. Surprisingly, results are in contrast to research on the selection process and show that feminine-style communication on Facebook is perceived as most attractive and hirable. However, masculine communication is perceived as least attractive and hirable. This effect was consistent regardless of applicant gender. Practical implications, strengths, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.

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Jan 4th, 12:00 AM Jan 7th, 12:00 AM

Gender (In)Consistent Communication via Social Media and Hireability: An Exploratory Study

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

Using social media in employee selection processes is relatively new behavior that raises many important questions. Although managers report using sites like Facebook to review applicants, little is known about how these sites influence assessments of those candidates. This exploratory study reports on an experiment designed to evaluate competing hypotheses regarding (in)consistent gender norm-based communication on Facebook and subsequent attraction and hiring decisions. All participants were required to have been responsible for actual hiring decisions during their careers. Surprisingly, results are in contrast to research on the selection process and show that feminine-style communication on Facebook is perceived as most attractive and hirable. However, masculine communication is perceived as least attractive and hirable. This effect was consistent regardless of applicant gender. Practical implications, strengths, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.

http://aisel.aisnet.org/hicss-50/dsm/social_media_culture/4