\
 

Start Date

16-8-2018 12:00 AM

Description

The use of online social networking sites (SNS) has exploded throughout the world despite constant concerns about the privacy of information disclosed on these sites. Trust has been found to be a factor in allowing consumers to ignore perceived risk (Jarvenpaa and Tractinsky 1999; McKnight and Chervany 2002). It may be that users have a sense of trust that the information they upload will remain private. This level of trust could mitigate users’ cognitive perceptions of the risk of such using these sites. However, different cultures define privacy differently (Laufer & Wolfe, 1977), and individuals may therefore have differing concepts of privacy and expectations of social network providers and network contacts. \ This study investigates the role of trust in mitigating an individual’s perceived risk of inadvertent disclosure (Privacy Risk) and thereby facilitating online disclosure. It proposes a multi-dimensional construct of trust composed of trust in the privacy mechanisms of the website (Technology Trust), trust in their own ability to manage the technology’s privacy mechanisms (Privacy Self-Efficacy), and trust in the discretion of network contacts (Interpersonal Trust). The study measures the perceptions of individuals from three cultures with differing expectations of privacy (US, France, and Qatar) to examine the difference in Perceived Privacy Risk, Privacy Salience, Technology Trust, Privacy Self-Efficacy, and Interpersonal Trust to determine how each influences willingness to disclose personal information in online social networking sites and examine differences between the cultures. \

Share

COinS
 
Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

The Role of Trust and Self-Efficacy in Mitigating Perceptions of Privacy Risk in Online Self-Disclosure

The use of online social networking sites (SNS) has exploded throughout the world despite constant concerns about the privacy of information disclosed on these sites. Trust has been found to be a factor in allowing consumers to ignore perceived risk (Jarvenpaa and Tractinsky 1999; McKnight and Chervany 2002). It may be that users have a sense of trust that the information they upload will remain private. This level of trust could mitigate users’ cognitive perceptions of the risk of such using these sites. However, different cultures define privacy differently (Laufer & Wolfe, 1977), and individuals may therefore have differing concepts of privacy and expectations of social network providers and network contacts. \ This study investigates the role of trust in mitigating an individual’s perceived risk of inadvertent disclosure (Privacy Risk) and thereby facilitating online disclosure. It proposes a multi-dimensional construct of trust composed of trust in the privacy mechanisms of the website (Technology Trust), trust in their own ability to manage the technology’s privacy mechanisms (Privacy Self-Efficacy), and trust in the discretion of network contacts (Interpersonal Trust). The study measures the perceptions of individuals from three cultures with differing expectations of privacy (US, France, and Qatar) to examine the difference in Perceived Privacy Risk, Privacy Salience, Technology Trust, Privacy Self-Efficacy, and Interpersonal Trust to determine how each influences willingness to disclose personal information in online social networking sites and examine differences between the cultures. \