\
 

Start Date

16-8-2018 12:00 AM

Description

Abstract \ \ Cryptocurrencies are emerging as central players in the digital global financial market. However, it is unclear as to whether currencies built on blockchain technology are being readily accepted by regional businesses/employers. In a recent article, Thompson (2018) opined that 2017 was a transformative year for Bitcoin. Bitcoin, which is publicly thought of as a type of “currency,” is touted as an algorithmically based form of payment that is not tied to any single nation (Hecht, 2018). However, to be clear, Bitcoin has been classified by the United States Commodity Futures Trading Commission as a commodity (Hecht, 2018). With that said, it has been reported that this “commodity” was accepted by 8,682 businesses in early 2017 and 9,143 businesses in late 2017, which shows a demonstrative growth in adoption of 5.3% (Thompson, 2018). Such gains signify that business educators should begin to augment their curriculum to include this revolutionary medium of exchange, or unwittingly allow current students to fall further behind in this cryptocurrency space. \ \ The problem this study proposes to address is the lack of information related to industry expectations related to student knowledge of digital currency, specifically in the CIS industry. In this study, researchers focus on the perspectives of the advisory board members of a four-year, regional, public institution. Advisory board members can provide insight into current trends, areas of opportunities, business needs and expectations of business leaders. Moreover, reviewing the curriculum and program offerings with business and industry partners helps to ensure the students continue to receive the education they need to be successful upon graduation and subsequent employment. \ \ The purpose of this research effort is to understand better what business and industry expect students to know about digital currency. This understanding can then be used to inform and guide educators during the curriculum design process. Researchers will survey and interview industry partners about their expectations related to student knowledge in relation to digital currency. The results will be analyzed to extract themes that will help the researchers generate a better understanding about what commonly held expectations these industry partners have about what students should know about digital currency upon graduation. In submitting this abstract, the authors are soliciting session attendees to review several interrogatories with researchers to determine if there should be any additional questions asked of industry partners that may provide further insight that could ultimately better equip our students, and/or students at large, to enter the current marketplace that now includes this new and prevalent digital asset. \ \ Sources: \ \ Hecht, A. (2018, February 22). What is bitcoin? Basic facts you should know about bitcoin. The Balance. Retrieved from https://www.thebalance.com/is-bitcoin-a-commodity-4126544 \ \ Thompson, P. (2018, January 1). Bitcoin adoption by businesses in 2017. Cointelegraph. Retrieved from https://cointelegraph.com/news/bitcoin-adoption-by-businesses-in-2017 \

Share

COinS
 
Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Digital Currencies and Employers’ Expectations of Business Graduates

Abstract \ \ Cryptocurrencies are emerging as central players in the digital global financial market. However, it is unclear as to whether currencies built on blockchain technology are being readily accepted by regional businesses/employers. In a recent article, Thompson (2018) opined that 2017 was a transformative year for Bitcoin. Bitcoin, which is publicly thought of as a type of “currency,” is touted as an algorithmically based form of payment that is not tied to any single nation (Hecht, 2018). However, to be clear, Bitcoin has been classified by the United States Commodity Futures Trading Commission as a commodity (Hecht, 2018). With that said, it has been reported that this “commodity” was accepted by 8,682 businesses in early 2017 and 9,143 businesses in late 2017, which shows a demonstrative growth in adoption of 5.3% (Thompson, 2018). Such gains signify that business educators should begin to augment their curriculum to include this revolutionary medium of exchange, or unwittingly allow current students to fall further behind in this cryptocurrency space. \ \ The problem this study proposes to address is the lack of information related to industry expectations related to student knowledge of digital currency, specifically in the CIS industry. In this study, researchers focus on the perspectives of the advisory board members of a four-year, regional, public institution. Advisory board members can provide insight into current trends, areas of opportunities, business needs and expectations of business leaders. Moreover, reviewing the curriculum and program offerings with business and industry partners helps to ensure the students continue to receive the education they need to be successful upon graduation and subsequent employment. \ \ The purpose of this research effort is to understand better what business and industry expect students to know about digital currency. This understanding can then be used to inform and guide educators during the curriculum design process. Researchers will survey and interview industry partners about their expectations related to student knowledge in relation to digital currency. The results will be analyzed to extract themes that will help the researchers generate a better understanding about what commonly held expectations these industry partners have about what students should know about digital currency upon graduation. In submitting this abstract, the authors are soliciting session attendees to review several interrogatories with researchers to determine if there should be any additional questions asked of industry partners that may provide further insight that could ultimately better equip our students, and/or students at large, to enter the current marketplace that now includes this new and prevalent digital asset. \ \ Sources: \ \ Hecht, A. (2018, February 22). What is bitcoin? Basic facts you should know about bitcoin. The Balance. Retrieved from https://www.thebalance.com/is-bitcoin-a-commodity-4126544 \ \ Thompson, P. (2018, January 1). Bitcoin adoption by businesses in 2017. Cointelegraph. Retrieved from https://cointelegraph.com/news/bitcoin-adoption-by-businesses-in-2017 \