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Start Date

16-8-2018 12:00 AM

Description

This study examines individuals’ responses to identity theft victimization and antecedents to their responses. An emotional response (i.e., distress) and four behavioral responses (i.e., avoidance of online transactions, avoidance of information disclosure, subscription to identity protection services, and emotional adjustment) are studied, along with four antecedents including the amount of financial loss, misuse of personal information by others, time spent resolving the issue, and time elapsed since the incident. A survey on 197 self-reported identity theft victims shows that the amount of financial loss, misuse of personal information, and time spent resolving the issue contribute to an overall assessment of victimization severity, and victimization severity, along with time elapsed since the incident, is mediated by emotional distress for the impact on behavioral responses. The study highlights the role of emotional distress in victims’ choices of behaviors to deal with identity theft, calling for more attention to emotional responses of victims.

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

How Do You Cope: Individuals’ Responses to Identity Theft Victimization

This study examines individuals’ responses to identity theft victimization and antecedents to their responses. An emotional response (i.e., distress) and four behavioral responses (i.e., avoidance of online transactions, avoidance of information disclosure, subscription to identity protection services, and emotional adjustment) are studied, along with four antecedents including the amount of financial loss, misuse of personal information by others, time spent resolving the issue, and time elapsed since the incident. A survey on 197 self-reported identity theft victims shows that the amount of financial loss, misuse of personal information, and time spent resolving the issue contribute to an overall assessment of victimization severity, and victimization severity, along with time elapsed since the incident, is mediated by emotional distress for the impact on behavioral responses. The study highlights the role of emotional distress in victims’ choices of behaviors to deal with identity theft, calling for more attention to emotional responses of victims.