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Start Date

16-8-2018 12:00 AM

Description

This study is a meta-research analysis that examined the role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) as an enabler of supply chain integration. Our analysis covered 55 papers in 34 journals published between 2007 and 2017. RFID systems were the most investigated ICTs in the supply chain integration literature. Besides its impact as an independent variable, ICT’s mediating and moderating roles are also noteworthy. Our study has demonstrated the underutilization of theories in general, dominance of surveys and single case studies, and future research opportunities for the underutilized IS types in SCI. Based on the findings, we proposed a research framework. Our framework illustrated two types of moderating factors between the use of ICT and level of SCI: (1) ICT-related factors as an enabler of SCI, and (2) other factors as an enabler of SCI. ICT-related factors are suitability, criticality, and maturity of ICT; ICT capabilities of, and integration within, an organization; ICT integration with SC partners; and technological differences among available ICT applications. Other factors are availability of industry standards; open information-sharing environment; institutional pressures and organizational culture; and involvement of top management.

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Information and Communications Technologies as an Enabler of Supply Chain Integration

This study is a meta-research analysis that examined the role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) as an enabler of supply chain integration. Our analysis covered 55 papers in 34 journals published between 2007 and 2017. RFID systems were the most investigated ICTs in the supply chain integration literature. Besides its impact as an independent variable, ICT’s mediating and moderating roles are also noteworthy. Our study has demonstrated the underutilization of theories in general, dominance of surveys and single case studies, and future research opportunities for the underutilized IS types in SCI. Based on the findings, we proposed a research framework. Our framework illustrated two types of moderating factors between the use of ICT and level of SCI: (1) ICT-related factors as an enabler of SCI, and (2) other factors as an enabler of SCI. ICT-related factors are suitability, criticality, and maturity of ICT; ICT capabilities of, and integration within, an organization; ICT integration with SC partners; and technological differences among available ICT applications. Other factors are availability of industry standards; open information-sharing environment; institutional pressures and organizational culture; and involvement of top management.