Paper Type

Short

Paper Number

1820

Description

Limited research has focused on the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) adoption among patients in developing countries or remote regions. This study thus aims to investigate factors that influence the acceptance of IoMT devices for remote patient monitoring (RPM) in the context of cardiac patients in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We develop a conceptual research model of IoMT adoption and investigate its adoption and usage behaviour. A structured questionnaire and snowball sampling technique will be used to collect primary data from both patients and medical practitioners, which will be analysed using partial least square-based structural equation modelling. This study theoretically extends the paradigm for existing information system adoption frameworks (i.e., UTAUT2) by incorporating scalability, the lack of infrastructure, privacy, and security issues in the context of IoMT for RPM. The study’s findings may provide guidelines for policymakers and healthcare professionals regarding more effective mechanisms for remote health monitoring.

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Healthcare

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Jul 2nd, 12:00 AM

Adoption of Remote Patient Monitoring Based on the Internet of Medical Things

Limited research has focused on the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) adoption among patients in developing countries or remote regions. This study thus aims to investigate factors that influence the acceptance of IoMT devices for remote patient monitoring (RPM) in the context of cardiac patients in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We develop a conceptual research model of IoMT adoption and investigate its adoption and usage behaviour. A structured questionnaire and snowball sampling technique will be used to collect primary data from both patients and medical practitioners, which will be analysed using partial least square-based structural equation modelling. This study theoretically extends the paradigm for existing information system adoption frameworks (i.e., UTAUT2) by incorporating scalability, the lack of infrastructure, privacy, and security issues in the context of IoMT for RPM. The study’s findings may provide guidelines for policymakers and healthcare professionals regarding more effective mechanisms for remote health monitoring.

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