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Journal of Information Systems Education

Abstract

The population of Web users was estimated at 37 million in the United States and Canada (16.6% of adult population) at the end of 1995. Like any new innovation on the market, organizations will take various amounts of time to assimilate this new technology. Web users already include executives, professionals, and others from all industries, special interest groups, families, government, and nonprofit organizations. The proliferation of interest in and the development of web resources, by and for mainstream America, means that the knowledge required to effectively navigate and use web resources will become an expected skill for graduating students in the near future. Organizations need knowledge workers more than ever and, in the face of rapid changes, may not be able to afford the time required to train new employees. Clearly, the basic set of technological skills expected of students entering the job market has evolved over past decades from typing to the use of personal productivity tools like word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. Students are now expected to be familiar with computer networks. If usage trends are any indicators, students will be expected by future employers to have developed proficiency in accessing and using Web resources. A recent survey suggests that 90% of companies with a portfolio of $350 million and over include the Web as a strategic component of products and services that they have to offer.

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