Paper Type

Complete

Abstract

Real-time feedback can improve clinical outcomes in healthcare environments like hospitals and foster a more engaged, resilient workforce. Within hospitals, the exchange of real-time feedback between physicians and residents provides valuable insights into workplace behavioral competencies. A public health crisis may differentially affect the feedback-writing behaviors of physicians and residents toward their colleagues. Crises can intensify incidents against caregivers, including physicians and residents, highlighting the heightened risks they face. This study explores how physicians and residents may differ in their generation of performance feedback during a crisis. Furthermore, we assess whether the feedback writers’ network embeddedness moderates the effect, given its role in shaping feedback behaviors. Leveraging a natural experiment, we conduct difference-in-difference models on proprietary data. We found that physicians are nicer during a public health crisis in providing their real-time feedback, and the network embeddedness further enhances the impact. Our research has important theoretical and managerial implications.

Paper Number

1525

Author Connect URL

https://authorconnect.aisnet.org/conferences/AMCIS2024/papers/1525

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

An Empirical Study of the Feedback Source on Real-time Doctor Feedback in A Crisis

Real-time feedback can improve clinical outcomes in healthcare environments like hospitals and foster a more engaged, resilient workforce. Within hospitals, the exchange of real-time feedback between physicians and residents provides valuable insights into workplace behavioral competencies. A public health crisis may differentially affect the feedback-writing behaviors of physicians and residents toward their colleagues. Crises can intensify incidents against caregivers, including physicians and residents, highlighting the heightened risks they face. This study explores how physicians and residents may differ in their generation of performance feedback during a crisis. Furthermore, we assess whether the feedback writers’ network embeddedness moderates the effect, given its role in shaping feedback behaviors. Leveraging a natural experiment, we conduct difference-in-difference models on proprietary data. We found that physicians are nicer during a public health crisis in providing their real-time feedback, and the network embeddedness further enhances the impact. Our research has important theoretical and managerial implications.

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