Paper Type

ERF

Abstract

Electronic health records (EHRs) are expected to improve care outcomes by making health information available to medical professionals as needed. EHRs also support the needs of other healthcare stakeholders (e.g., administrators, regulators) by increasing information availability and standardizing processes. Understanding how EHRs impact stakeholders differently is necessary to make sure those systems meet the needs of all stakeholders. Institutional logics is a well-established theory for understanding goals and outcomes for different stakeholders. In healthcare, relevant logics include 1) medical professionalism (clinical care), 2) private-sector managerialism (healthcare administration), 3) regulatory oversight (governance/compliance), and 4) technical design (systems design, development, and support). This research examines the interactions of these logics through a case study of EHR use in a medical residency program. Our contribution to research and practice is to demonstrate how the design and integration of EHRs and other medical applications can support and enhance medical professionals’ learning and work practices.

Paper Number

1897

Comments

SIGHEALTH

Share

COinS
 
Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

The role of technology in medical professional development: An institutional logics perspective

Electronic health records (EHRs) are expected to improve care outcomes by making health information available to medical professionals as needed. EHRs also support the needs of other healthcare stakeholders (e.g., administrators, regulators) by increasing information availability and standardizing processes. Understanding how EHRs impact stakeholders differently is necessary to make sure those systems meet the needs of all stakeholders. Institutional logics is a well-established theory for understanding goals and outcomes for different stakeholders. In healthcare, relevant logics include 1) medical professionalism (clinical care), 2) private-sector managerialism (healthcare administration), 3) regulatory oversight (governance/compliance), and 4) technical design (systems design, development, and support). This research examines the interactions of these logics through a case study of EHR use in a medical residency program. Our contribution to research and practice is to demonstrate how the design and integration of EHRs and other medical applications can support and enhance medical professionals’ learning and work practices.

When commenting on articles, please be friendly, welcoming, respectful and abide by the AIS eLibrary Discussion Thread Code of Conduct posted here.