Paper Type

Complete

Abstract

Telemedicine has emerged as a critical tool in healthcare delivery, offering remote clinical services and addressing barriers to access. The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated its adoption, particularly among older adults. However, despite its widespread use, multiple areas remain unknown. This study examines the association of telemedicine with behavioral outcomes and mental status among older adults, using data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) COVID-19 Supplement. Our findings indicate that while telemedicine users showed comparable vaccination uptake behavior to in-person visits, they reported higher level of stress and anxiety. Disparities were observed in vaccination uptake and reasons for not getting vaccinated, highlighting the need for targeted interventions. Despite the benefits, telemedicine’s negative association with mental well-being warrants further investigation and intervention. This study contributes to our understanding of telemedicine's effectiveness and underscores the importance of addressing disparities and mental health considerations in telemedicine implementation and policy.

Paper Number

1632

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Telemedicine Utilization Among Older Adults During COVID-19: Associations with Vaccination Uptake and Mental Status

Telemedicine has emerged as a critical tool in healthcare delivery, offering remote clinical services and addressing barriers to access. The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated its adoption, particularly among older adults. However, despite its widespread use, multiple areas remain unknown. This study examines the association of telemedicine with behavioral outcomes and mental status among older adults, using data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) COVID-19 Supplement. Our findings indicate that while telemedicine users showed comparable vaccination uptake behavior to in-person visits, they reported higher level of stress and anxiety. Disparities were observed in vaccination uptake and reasons for not getting vaccinated, highlighting the need for targeted interventions. Despite the benefits, telemedicine’s negative association with mental well-being warrants further investigation and intervention. This study contributes to our understanding of telemedicine's effectiveness and underscores the importance of addressing disparities and mental health considerations in telemedicine implementation and policy.

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