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Paper Type

Complete

Abstract

In this study, we challenge conventional wisdom in digital peer-to-peer marketplaces and reveal that identifiable faces in service providers' photos may reduce business demand. Employing Airbnb data from multiple cities and advanced analytical tools, including deep learning models, we further uncover that quality service badges, such as a "Superhost" badge, can mitigate this negative impact. Our findings question the assumption that personal photographs invariably boost consumer trust and suggest that excessive personal revelation can provoke cognitive biases and reduce demand. Theoretically, our research contributes to understanding online social presence and trust-building, advocating for a nuanced approach to personalization that balances anonymity with disclosure. Practically, it advises service providers and platforms to reconsider photo guidelines, promoting less personal and more professional imagery. Our study suggests a shift in digital self-presentation strategies, offering insights for future research on demographic influences and cross-cultural differences, thereby enhancing digital presence in an evolving marketplace.

Paper Number

1714

Author Connect URL

https://authorconnect.aisnet.org/conferences/AMCIS2024/papers/1714

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Faceless Appeal: Rethinking Visibility in Sharing

In this study, we challenge conventional wisdom in digital peer-to-peer marketplaces and reveal that identifiable faces in service providers' photos may reduce business demand. Employing Airbnb data from multiple cities and advanced analytical tools, including deep learning models, we further uncover that quality service badges, such as a "Superhost" badge, can mitigate this negative impact. Our findings question the assumption that personal photographs invariably boost consumer trust and suggest that excessive personal revelation can provoke cognitive biases and reduce demand. Theoretically, our research contributes to understanding online social presence and trust-building, advocating for a nuanced approach to personalization that balances anonymity with disclosure. Practically, it advises service providers and platforms to reconsider photo guidelines, promoting less personal and more professional imagery. Our study suggests a shift in digital self-presentation strategies, offering insights for future research on demographic influences and cross-cultural differences, thereby enhancing digital presence in an evolving marketplace.

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