Abstract

The purpose of this study is to understand the use of digital infrastructure for port container handling and success or failure of stakeholders’ goals. Information Systems (IS) research on digital infrastructure has focused more on health, telecommunication, government, and manufacturing and less on port container handling. IS literature on DI has focused more on e-health, e-government, e-commerce as well as different industries and platforms and less on the use of DI and success or failure of stakeholder goals. To address this gap, we employed affordance theory as an analytical lens and qualitative, interpretive case study as a methodology to investigate the use of digital infrastructure for port container handling in Ghana. The findings show how digital infrastructure conditions success or failure of stakeholder goals. The findings also have implications for research, practice, and policy. This paper contributes to the emerging literature stream on digital infrastructures. The originality of the paper lies in its focus on the use of port container handling systems as a significant IS research phenomenon.

COinS
 

Digital Infrastructure for Port Container Handling and Success or Failure of Stakeholders’ Goals: A Case Study of Ghana

The purpose of this study is to understand the use of digital infrastructure for port container handling and success or failure of stakeholders’ goals. Information Systems (IS) research on digital infrastructure has focused more on health, telecommunication, government, and manufacturing and less on port container handling. IS literature on DI has focused more on e-health, e-government, e-commerce as well as different industries and platforms and less on the use of DI and success or failure of stakeholder goals. To address this gap, we employed affordance theory as an analytical lens and qualitative, interpretive case study as a methodology to investigate the use of digital infrastructure for port container handling in Ghana. The findings show how digital infrastructure conditions success or failure of stakeholder goals. The findings also have implications for research, practice, and policy. This paper contributes to the emerging literature stream on digital infrastructures. The originality of the paper lies in its focus on the use of port container handling systems as a significant IS research phenomenon.