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Start Date

16-8-2018 12:00 AM

Description

In spite of much prior work, the design of city services remains the purview of designers and city governments. We examine one community in a city, the elderly, to understand how their value priorities influence their use of city services. Following a semi-structured approach, interviews were conducted with elderly individuals to understand their use of city services. The data analysis consisted of open coding, followed by structuring the findings in light of prior work. The analyses showed that three value priorities influenced the use of citizen services by the elderly community. These were: safety, social interaction and volunteering. These value priorities persisted as important considerations for the design of new services. However, the respondents were not able to articulate specific opportunities for design or improvement of services. The identification of value priorities may, however, provide pointers that the designers can use to derive requirements for new citizen services. The findings contribute to a better understanding of how value priorities of individuals and communities influence the use of city services.

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

The Influence of Values on the Use of Citizen Services: The Elderly Perspective

In spite of much prior work, the design of city services remains the purview of designers and city governments. We examine one community in a city, the elderly, to understand how their value priorities influence their use of city services. Following a semi-structured approach, interviews were conducted with elderly individuals to understand their use of city services. The data analysis consisted of open coding, followed by structuring the findings in light of prior work. The analyses showed that three value priorities influenced the use of citizen services by the elderly community. These were: safety, social interaction and volunteering. These value priorities persisted as important considerations for the design of new services. However, the respondents were not able to articulate specific opportunities for design or improvement of services. The identification of value priorities may, however, provide pointers that the designers can use to derive requirements for new citizen services. The findings contribute to a better understanding of how value priorities of individuals and communities influence the use of city services.