Location

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

Event Website

http://hicss.hawaii.edu/

Start Date

1-3-2018

End Date

1-6-2018

Description

Driven by the escalating pressures to enhance its outcomes within its limited resources, the healthcare industry is increasingly investing in various clinical information systems. Although user satisfaction is key to realizing the benefits of these large invests, the determinant factors for user satisfaction with clinical information systems are still not well understood. This study addresses this need by qualitatively investigating the relationships between the overall satisfaction with clinical information systems and five key aspects of clinical information systems, namely key functionalities, efficiency of use, intuitiveness of graphical user interfaces (GUI), communication, collaboration, and information exchange, and interoperability and compatibility issues. The findings resulting from both descriptive and thematic analyses show that clinical information systems are still in their infant stage and that their maturity is highly questionable. Simpler clinical information systems are likely to be more satisfying than more complex systems. System design and training provided are also key factors as the study finds.

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Jan 3rd, 12:00 AM Jan 6th, 12:00 AM

The Key Determinant Factors of Clinical Information Systems User Satisfaction: Lessons Learnt From an Australian Case Study

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

Driven by the escalating pressures to enhance its outcomes within its limited resources, the healthcare industry is increasingly investing in various clinical information systems. Although user satisfaction is key to realizing the benefits of these large invests, the determinant factors for user satisfaction with clinical information systems are still not well understood. This study addresses this need by qualitatively investigating the relationships between the overall satisfaction with clinical information systems and five key aspects of clinical information systems, namely key functionalities, efficiency of use, intuitiveness of graphical user interfaces (GUI), communication, collaboration, and information exchange, and interoperability and compatibility issues. The findings resulting from both descriptive and thematic analyses show that clinical information systems are still in their infant stage and that their maturity is highly questionable. Simpler clinical information systems are likely to be more satisfying than more complex systems. System design and training provided are also key factors as the study finds.

http://aisel.aisnet.org/hicss-51/hc/it_adoption_in_healthcare/5