Location

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

Event Website

http://hicss.hawaii.edu/

Start Date

1-3-2018

End Date

1-6-2018

Description

This study attempts to critically assess the democratizing potential of "CrowdLaw," a form of online participation that its practitioners describe as crowdsourced policy-making. To do so, the study analyzes both the statements of Crowdlaw practitioners gathered at the third "online global conference on #CrowdLaw" and the design and performance of the CrowdLaw platforms for which the author could find a sufficiently complete online presence. Findings about the democratizing potential of CrowdLaw are mixed: on the one hand, the analysis of practitioners’ statements reveals an intention to create broad participation, and discussion forums that encourage deliberation. On the other, a look at the platforms’ design and performance reveals an uneven and incomplete implementation of these intentions.

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Jan 3rd, 12:00 AM Jan 6th, 12:00 AM

Can Digital Technologies Create a Stronger Model for Democratic Participation? The Case of #Crowdlaw

Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii

This study attempts to critically assess the democratizing potential of "CrowdLaw," a form of online participation that its practitioners describe as crowdsourced policy-making. To do so, the study analyzes both the statements of Crowdlaw practitioners gathered at the third "online global conference on #CrowdLaw" and the design and performance of the CrowdLaw platforms for which the author could find a sufficiently complete online presence. Findings about the democratizing potential of CrowdLaw are mixed: on the one hand, the analysis of practitioners’ statements reveals an intention to create broad participation, and discussion forums that encourage deliberation. On the other, a look at the platforms’ design and performance reveals an uneven and incomplete implementation of these intentions.

http://aisel.aisnet.org/hicss-51/eg/participation_in_open_government/4